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AWS Video CMS Prototype

Solutioning, Engineering

Overview

Despite continued and sustained advancement, the underlying building blocks of IT systems changed little in the decades prior to the year 2000. The arrival of the first cloud services from Amazon in 2006 (EC2 and S3) provided a glimpse of what was possible with cloud computing and hinted at the paradigm shift that is now transforming IT. By freeing organizations from deploying infrastructure and replacing the endeavor with utility-based services and pricing, Amazon’s cloud allowed capex expenditure to transition to opex expenditure. These initial services, however, failed to provide the breadth of capability required to support complex IT systems. As a result, Amazon’s initial capabilities and those that followed shortly thereafter provided continuity with traditional approaches to software development and hence represented a Cloud 1.0 paradigm.

Today Amazon and its competitors in the IaaS / PaaS segment of cloud computing each offer close to a hundred IT infrastructure related building blocks. Amplifying these foundational capabilities are a variety of higher-level platform functions available from an ever growing set of innovative and efficiency conscious SaaS providers. Together with new thinking around architecture and software delivery, today’s cloud capabilities truly represent a break from traditional IT thinking and should be viewed as a new paradigm for software development. This new approach is aptly referred to as Cloud 2.0.

Seeing this technology shift occurring around it, a European provider of OTT services realized its aging technology stack and development methodologies were hindering its agility and adding sizable expense to its operating model. The company’s CTO wanted to undertake a major upgrade of the company’s platform but was unclear how to convey his vision. He realized he needed a concrete example – e.g. a reference architecture. The CTO also felt uncertain about his ability to “sell” his vision internally. Without hard, empirical evidence justifying its relevance, he felt the effort would be deprioritized relative to other strategic initiatives.

What We Did

Konstrukt was challenged by the service provider’s CTO to demonstrate the business and economic potential that could be realized from a Cloud 2.0 paradigm. The team responded by developing a prototype that addressed the key functions of a video CMS. The prototype made use of a Microservice architecture and leveraged a breadth of capabilities from Amazon Web Services. Konstrukt’s work aligned with parallel efforts that were underway to revamp the service provider’s development culture around DevOps and included the use of Docker and other tools necessary to support continuous delivery and deployment.

Once the prototype was developed, Konstrukt conducted a series of simulations in order to demonstrate how the architecture would respond under user and IO load. The tests were driven by a series of Gatling scripts and allowed Konstrukt to estimate the hourly costs at various user and IO loads.

Konstrukt presented the results of the engagement in a half-day workshop lead by the service provider’s CTO and attended by his engineering leads. The agenda included a review of the prototype’s architecture and underlying technology stack as well as detailed walk-throughs of key use cases. The workshop also reviewed the economic findings from the simulations.

Technologies Used: Elastic Load Balancing, Elastic Container Service, Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon API Gateway, Amazon S3, Amazon Glacier, Amazon SQS, StormPath, Wildfly Swarm, Docker

Outcome

The findings from the engagement convinced the CTO that his engineering team should embrace a cloud-native mentality. The prototype architecture now serves as a reference for such a transition with its supporting technology and implementation patterns providing a clear indication of how a Cloud 2.0 approach can improve the durability of a solution while lowering its cost of operation.

AWS Video CMS Prototype

Solutioning, Engineering

Overview

Despite continued and sustained advancement, the underlying building blocks of IT systems changed little in the decades prior to the year 2000. The arrival of the first cloud services from Amazon in 2006 (EC2 and S3) provided a glimpse of what was possible with cloud computing and hinted at the paradigm shift that is now transforming IT. By freeing organizations from deploying infrastructure and replacing the endeavor with utility-based services and pricing, Amazon’s cloud allowed capex expenditure to transition to opex expenditure. These initial services, however, failed to provide the breadth of capability required to support complex IT systems. As a result, Amazon’s initial capabilities and those that followed shortly thereafter provided continuity with traditional approaches to software development and hence represented a Cloud 1.0 paradigm.

Today Amazon and its competitors in the IaaS / PaaS segment of cloud computing each offer close to a hundred IT infrastructure related building blocks. Amplifying these foundational capabilities are a variety of higher-level platform functions available from an ever growing set of innovative and efficiency conscious SaaS providers. Together with new thinking around architecture and software delivery, today’s cloud capabilities truly represent a break from traditional IT thinking and should be viewed as a new paradigm for software development. This new approach is aptly referred to as Cloud 2.0.

Seeing this technology shift occurring around it, a European provider of OTT services realized its aging technology stack and development methodologies were hindering its agility and adding sizable expense to its operating model. The company’s CTO wanted to undertake a major upgrade of the company’s platform but was unclear how to convey his vision. He realized he needed a concrete example – e.g. a reference architecture. The CTO also felt uncertain about his ability to “sell” his vision internally. Without hard, empirical evidence justifying its relevance, he felt the effort would be deprioritized relative to other strategic initiatives.

What We Did

Konstrukt was challenged by the service provider’s CTO to demonstrate the business and economic potential that could be realized from a Cloud 2.0 paradigm. The team responded by developing a prototype that addressed the key functions of a video CMS. The prototype made use of a Microservice architecture and leveraged a breadth of capabilities from Amazon Web Services. Konstrukt’s work aligned with parallel efforts that were underway to revamp the service provider’s development culture around DevOps and included the use of Docker and other tools necessary to support continuous delivery and deployment.

Once the prototype was developed, Konstrukt conducted a series of simulations in order to demonstrate how the architecture would respond under user and IO load. The tests were driven by a series of Gatling scripts and allowed Konstrukt to estimate the hourly costs at various user and IO loads.

Konstrukt presented the results of the engagement in a half-day workshop lead by the service provider’s CTO and attended by his engineering leads. The agenda included a review of the prototype’s architecture and underlying technology stack as well as detailed walk-throughs of key use cases. The workshop also reviewed the economic findings from the simulations.

Technologies Used: Elastic Load Balancing, Elastic Container Service, Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon API Gateway, Amazon S3, Amazon Glacier, Amazon SQS, StormPath, Wildfly Swarm, Docker

Outcome

The findings from the engagement convinced the CTO that his engineering team should embrace a cloud-native mentality. The prototype architecture now serves as a reference for such a transition with its supporting technology and implementation patterns providing a clear indication of how a Cloud 2.0 approach can improve the durability of a solution while lowering its cost of operation.